Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz reviewing the Eco Socialist Movements webinar and The Code: Ten Intentions for a Better World, and our first guest Tina Rogers on the Mother of Black Feminism Anna J. Cooper and the Mother of Black History Vivian C. Harsh, and our second guest Rev. Dr. Patricia Keel on Resurrection in Ourself, has been uploaded to the web archive.

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Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz reviewing the Eco Socialist Movements webinar and The Code: Ten Intentions for a Better World, and our first guest Tina Rogers on the Mother of Black Feminism Anna J. Cooper and the Mother of Black History Vivian C. Harsh, and our second guest Rev. Dr. Patricia Keel on Resurrection in Ourself, has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 4/12/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 4/14/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210412.html

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Our History is our Strength Series – Influential Black American Women: Anna J. Cooper and Vivian C. Harsh

Our Resurrection Story

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Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz

2. Tina Rogers, Multicultural Arts Educator

3. Rev. Dr. Patricial Keel, Founder, Spirit Matters Coaching

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1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz:  Elaine reviews the EcoSocialist Movements Webinar of April 10, 2021, whose event video can be seen at www.facebook.com/102883121495482/videos/457273005338840. Joining community organizations is important to keep you connected to social changes that are needed.

Eco Socialst Movements Webinar of 4/10/2021

Elaine then reads The Code: Ten Intentions for a Better World published by the Intenders for the Highest Good at https://www.intenders.com/the-code-2/ to “put you on the fasttrack to manifesting.”

The Code

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2Tina Rogers is continuing Our History is Our Strength series on influential Black American Women, that she will present each second Monday of the month on Women’s Spaces.  Anna Julia Hayward Cooper (1858-1964) was a very prominent scholar and Suffragist who was the fourth African American woman to earn her doctorate, which she did at the Sorbonne in Paris. Her book A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South, was widely acclaimed and because of it Anna Cooper is often called “the Mother of Black Feminism”.  Vivian C. Harsh (1890-1960) is considered the “Mother of Black History,” because of her devotion in collecting literature on every phase of life of Black Americans. The Vivian Harsh Collection was assembled as she was head librarian at George Cleveland Hall Branch of the Chicago Public Library on Chicago’s South Side. 

Tina Rogers
Tina Rogers

About our Guest:  Tina Rogers is a native of Sonoma County. She has devoted her life in trying to understand this beautiful planet, the humans and the other species that share our world. A true humanitarian is what she represents, thorough research, education, and communication with other cultures allows her to see the “big picture.” While attending UC Davis, she turned her passion for the arts, fitness, and wellness into a popular example of master teaching not only to children but people of all ages.
Tina Rogers is a role model who enjoys using arts education and fitness, as tools to “crack-the-code” in child development that lasts a lifetime. Elaine and Ken have seen her presentation of Black History through the spoken word and dance and found the experience to be both educational and inspiring.

Guest Links: 

Biography of Anna J. Cooper: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_J._Cooper

Chicago Tribune article on Vivan Harsh: https://www.chicagotribune.com/opinion/commentary/ct-opinion-flashback-vivian-harsh-librarian-black-history-20200131-q5ikqwpzo5albdtz5smbyx3dga-story.html

Contact Tina Rogers: funkystylestreetdance@gmail.com

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3. Rev. Dr. Patricial Keel addreses the metaphysics of the Easter story as our own inner story of Self.  Each character in the Crucifixion and Resurrection portrayed in the the Gospel of John represent aspects within us. Even a Peter praised for his high faith betrays Jesus three times, as we so often betray our True Self.  But the Divine is ever within us ready to mirror into the outer expressions of our life.  Patricia has been making annual visits for classes in India and notes that Jesus must have learned from the mystics of the East.  Patricia emphasizes that the Resurrection is about consciousness, not our body. As Jesus asked forgiveness for his persecutors, so we can give up resentment for love’s sake.  Breath techniques help us to be present to reflect on issues we are experiencing and transforming them into Easter experiences of higher consciousness of compassion.

Rev. Dr. Patricia Keel
Rev.Dr. Patricia Keel

About our Guest:  Rev. Dr. Patricial Keel is a longtime student of metaphysics and a spiritual teacher combining western metaphysics with eastern mysticism. She believes that every woman carries within her the wisdom, insight, and inner strength to overcome challenges and create miracles in the world. Her work as a teacher, coach, speaker, and trainer spans over 30 years with diverse groups from all cultures, faiths, and traditions. Patricia was the Founding minister of Unity of Berkeley and is currently a frequent Guest Minister at Unity churches. Her study in India over the past 14 years brings a unique depth to her work as East meets Western spirituality. Patricia Keel is founder of Spirit Matters Coaching.

Guest Links:

https://patriciakeel.com/

Spirit Matters Coaching https://spiritmatterscoaching.coachesconsole.com/

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Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory Birthdays:

April 13, 1892 (1990) – Clara Beyer, labor lawyer, worked with Frances Perkins and Molly Dewson on the Social Security Act of 1935, campaigned to abolish child labor and to secure minimum wage and maximum hour scales.

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Announcements

Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Day of Action campaign of National Sexual Violence Resource Center: www.nsvrc.org

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PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

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Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

Pale Moon
sung by Becky Hobbs from the album Nanheyi – Beloved Woman of the Cherokee (2011 Becky Hobbs)

She Rises Like the Dolphin sung by Kate Wolf from the album Live in Mendocino (2018 Owl Records)

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

LLink:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz on April designated as Sexual Assault Awareness Month, our first guest Alicia Sanchez on Radio KBBF receiving the Silver Heart Award, and our second guest Terri Moon on Emotional Fluency Part 2 has been uploaded to the web archive.

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Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz on April designated as Sexual Assault Awareness Month, our first guest Alicia Sanchez on Radio KBBF receiving the Silver Heart Award, and our second guest Terri Moon on Emotional Fluency Part 2 has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 4/5/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 4/7/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210405.html

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KBBF Honored With Silver Heart Award by Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ)

Emotional Fluency, Part 2

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Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz

2. Alicia Sanchez, Chair, Board of Directors, Radio KBBF

3. Terri Moon, Communications Facilitator

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1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) to help stop sexual asault, harassment and abuse before they happen with education. Every year on the first Tuesday in April since 2004, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center has been promoting the SAAM Day of Action.  For more information visit www.nsvrc.org  

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2Alicia Sanchez talks her proud moment in February 2021 of accepting for Radio KBBF the prestigious Silver Heart Award by the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) –  Northern California Chapter. The award was given for the station has a whole, programmers and staff, for the help it gave to the communty over the decades but espeially during the wildfires and pandemic. Women’s Spaces is produced live in the studios of Radio KBBF, where it also broadcasts on Mondays at 11 am and at 11 pm.

 About our Guest:  Alicia Sanchez is the Chair and President of the Board of Directors and Executive Director of Radio KBBF. She came to Santa Rosa in 1969 and became aware of a group of Chicano students who wanted to start a bilingual public radio station. Unfortunately, she was off to college and was not here when KBBF went on the air in 1973. She returned to Santa Rosa in 1986 and since then has played many roles with KBBF—listener, interviewee, election observer, and board member. Alicia has been a long time activist working on issues affecting workers, immigrants, women, and youth as well as an advocate for non-violence and social justice. Since 2010 she has been a full time volunteer with KBBF because of her love and passion for serving the community. She believes in KBBF’s vision and legacy. Her contact information is alicia.sanchez@kbbf-fm.org and 707-545-8833.

Guest Links: 

Radio KBBF streaming at:  https://kbbf.org/

Alicia Sanchez email:  alicia.sanchez@kbbf-fm.org

Radio KBBF Office telephone: 707-545-8833.

Santa Rosa’s Multilingual Radio Station KBBF Wins Recognition by Will Carruthers, The Bohemian, 2/17/2021 article: https://bohemian.com/santa-rosas-multilingual-radio-station-kbbf-wins-recognition/ 

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3. Terri Moon rreturns to continues talking about emotional fluency where we leff off in last week’s show.  Terri shares 3 tools to fend off anxiety and despair. The first is to be aware of current thought with its wake of feelings and emotions. This reflection with empathy helps us unpack the thought, which gives us a choice to continue it or not.  The second tool is to realize when not happy what need is not being met and to  match it with our addictive behavior to soothe it. The third tool is Terri Moon’s list of 100 words to help identify the needs met or unmet.  Together with our curiousity we can become masters of what thoughts we entertain. Listen to Terri describe the path of realizing our emotional fluency. Email Terri for a list of the 100 words.

About our Guest:  Terri Moon is the founder of terrimoon.com, has taught effective and empowering ways of thinking and communicating for 16 years. She has 33 years’ experience as a holistic health care practitioner, is an international best-selling author, and an inspirational speaker and workshop facilitator. Terri offers mediations, group communication skills trainings and private compassionate listening sessions to support authentic, artful, and aligned living. Her clients experience meaning and purpose in their work lives, joy & authenticity in their relationships, enoughness in their lives and harmony with each other and nature.

Guest Links:

Harmony at Home https://terrimoon.com/

For free gift of 100 words to help identify needs met and not met, email Terri Moon at terri@terrimoon.com

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Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory of the National Women’s History Alliance:  

In 1980, the National Women’s History Project (NWHP) was founded in Santa Rosa, California by Molly Murphy MacGregor, Mary Ruthsdotter, Maria Cuevas, Paula Hammett and Bette Morgan to broadcast women’s historical achievements.
The NWHP started by leading a coalition that successfully lobbied Congress to designate March as National Women’s History Month, now celebrated across the land.
Today, the NWHP Now the National Women’s History Alliance is known nationally as the only clearinghouse providing information and training in multicultural women’s history for educators, community organizations, and parents-for anyone wanting to expand their understanding of women contributions to U. S. history.

Herstory Events:

April 5, 1911 – 100,000 to 500,000 people march in New York City to attend the funeral of seven unidentified victims of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire in late March.

April 7, 1805 – Sacagawea begins helping the Lewis and Clark Expedition as an interpreter.

April 9, 1939 – Marian Anderson sings an Easter Sunday concert for more than 75,000 at Lincoln Memorial.

Herstory Birthdays:

April 9, 1917 (2007) – Irene Morgan Kirkaldy, defied bus driver in 1944 who ordered her to give up her seat and move to the segregated back, kicked the sheriff when arrested, Thurgood Marshall won her case (6-1) on grounds of promoting and protecting national travel, awarded Freedom Medal by President Clinton who said she “took the first step on a journey that would change.

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Annnnouncements

Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Day of Action campaign of National Sexual Violence Resource Center: www.nsvrc.org

  —-

PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

—-

Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

Pale Moon
sung by Becky Hobbs from the album Nanheyi – Beloved Woman of the Cherokee (2011 Becky Hobbs)

She Rises Like the Dolphin sung by Kate Wolf from the album Live in Mendocino (2018 Owl Records)

—-

For music purchasing opportunity: 

LLink:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz on Faith Ross being named Sonoma County Woman of the Year, our first guest Kristin Flyntz reading her “Imagined Letter from COVID-19 to Humans,” and our second guest Terri Moon on Emotional Fluency has been uploaded to the web archive.

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Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz on Faith Ross being named Sonoma County Woman of the Year, our first guest Kristin Flyntz reading her “Imagined Letter from COVID-19 to Humans,” and our second guest Terri Moon on Emotional Fluency has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 3/29/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 3/31/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210329.html

—-

An Imagined Letter from COVID-19 to Humans

Emotional Fluency

Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz

2. Kristin Flyntz, Writer and Assistant Editor, Dark Matter: Women Witnessing

3. Terri Moon, Communications Facilitator

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1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz

     Faith Ross, founder of the Petaluma Blacks was named by Sen. Bill Dodd as Sonoma County’s Woman of the Year.  When presenting her the honor he said, “Faith kept a spotlight on the many contributions of African Americans and the challenges they continue to face at a time of great reckoning in our country,” Dodd said in the release. “She emerged as a leading voice in our community as we strive for racial equity and social justice. I’m proud to recognize her efforts at this turning point in our history.” I am proud to know and have worked with Faith on the Sonoma County Human Rights Committee. She is a dedicated community person/organizer and I agree with all Senator Dodd said about her. Congratulations Faith, you deserve the recognition. The  children in our community are in a better world due to your efforts.

     Shout Out To: North Bay Organizing Project’s “Deep Democracy Civic” team and Sonoma County ACLU  for presenting such a great panel providing information on the role the District Attorney has in criminal justice reform, the DA’s job description, and tips on what to look for when voting for the district attorney. I know next year this county will be voting for a new district attorney, and getting educated about this vital position is important.

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2Kristin Flyntz joins us from Connecticut to read her Imagined Letter from Covid-19 to Humans. She shares how she came to write the letter last year and how her facebook post of it went viral.

An Imagined Letter from Covid-19 to Humans

Stop. Just stop.
It is no longer a request.
It is a mandate.
We will help you.
We will bring the supersonic, high speed merry-go-round to a halt
We will stop
the planes
the trains
the schools
the malls
the meetings
the frenetic, furied rush of illusions and “obligations” that keep you from hearing
our single and shared beating heart,
the way we breathe together
in unison.
Our obligation is to each other,
As it has always been,
even if— even though—
you have forgotten.
We will interrupt this broadcast,
the endless cacophonous broadcast of divisions and distractions,
to bring you this long-breaking news:
We are not well.
None of us;
all of us are suffering.
Last year, the firestorms that scorched the lungs of the earth
did not give you pause.
Nor the typhoons in Africa,China, Japan.
Nor the fevered climates in Japan and India.
You have not been listening.
It is hard to listen when you are so busy all the time,
hustling to uphold the comforts and conveniences that scaffold your lives.
But the foundation is giving way,
buckling under the weight of your needs and desires.
We will help you.
We will bring the firestorms to your body
We will bring the fever to your body
We will bring the burning, searing, and flooding to your lungs
that you might hear:
We are not well.
Despite what you might think or feel, we are not the enemy.
We are Messenger.
We are Ally. We are a balancing force.
We are asking you:
To stop, to be still, to listen;
To move beyond your individual concerns
and consider the concerns of all;
To be with your ignorance, to find your humility,
to relinquish your thinking minds and travel deep into the mind of the heart;
To look up into the sky, streaked with fewer planes, and see it,
to notice its condition: clear, smoky, smoggy, rainy?
How much do you need it to be healthy so that you may also be healthy?
To look at a tree, and see it, to notice its condition:
how does its health contribute to the health of the sky, to the air you need to be healthy?
To visit a river, and see it, to notice its condition: clear, clean, murky, polluted?
How much do you need it to be healthy so that you may also be healthy?
How does its health contribute to the health of the tree, who contributes to the health of
the sky, so that you may also be healthy?
Many are afraid now. Do not demonize your fear, and also, do not let it rule you.
Instead, let it guide you—
in your stillness, listen for its wisdom.
What might it be telling you about what is at work, at issue, at risk,
beyond the threat of personal inconvenience and illness?
As the health of a tree, a river, the sky tells you about quality of your own health,
what might the quality of your health tell you about the health of the rivers,
the trees, the sky,
and all of us who share this planet with you?
Stop.
Notice if you are resisting.
Notice what you are resisting.
Ask why.
Stop. Just stop.
We will help you, if you listen.
                                      (c) Kristin Flyntz, 2019.

 About our Guest:  Kristin Flyntz is a writer, editor, and dreamer who lives in northern Connecticut on land that once belonged to the Algonkian peoples, including bands of the Agawam and Tunxis tribes. She is assistant editor of Dark Matter: Women Witnessing, which publishes writing and visual art in response to an age of massive species loss and environmental collapse. It is a home for dreams, visions, and communications with the nonhuman realms—especially those with messages for how humans might restore their relationship to the earth. Currently she is engaged in a grassroots global effort to save up to 1,500 elder oaks from being felled to rebuild Notre Dame cathedral. She and her musician husband live with two feline companions and teachers, Ophelia, and Zoe.

Guest Links:

Dark Matter – Women Witnessing https://darkmatterwomenwitnessing.com/ 

 —-

3. Terri Moon talks about the importance of being aware of more feelings of our body then our intellect with its judgments and assumptions.  We need the emotional fluency to identify feelings when they arise and to express them.  Feelings are our inner GPS guidance system. Terri gives us some examples and advice on getting out of our heads into our body.

About our Guest:  Terri Moon is the founder of terrimoon.com, has taught effective and empowering ways of thinking and communicating for 16 years. She has 33 years’ experience as a holistic health care practitioner, is an international best-selling author, and an inspirational speaker and workshop facilitator. Terri offers mediations, group communication skills trainings and private compassionate listening sessions to support authentic, artful, and aligned living. Her clients experience meaning and purpose in their work lives, joy & authenticity in their relationships, enoughness in their lives and harmony with each other and nature.

Guest Links:

Harmony at Home https://terrimoon.com/

—-

Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory of the National Women’s History Alliance:  

In 1980, the National Women’s History Project (NWHP) was founded in Santa Rosa, California by Molly Murphy MacGregor, Mary Ruthsdotter, Maria Cuevas, Paula Hammett and Bette Morgan to broadcast women’s historical achievements.
The NWHP started by leading a coalition that successfully lobbied Congress to designate March as National Women’s History Month, now celebrated across the land.
Today, the NWHP Now the National Women’s History Alliance is known nationally as the only clearinghouse providing information and training in multicultural women’s history for educators, community organizations, and parents-for anyone wanting to expand their understanding of women contributions to U. S. history.

Herstory Events:

March 31, 1888 – The National Council of Women of the U.S. is organized by Susan B. Anthony, Clara Barton, Julia Ward Howe, and Sojourner Truth, among others, the oldest non-sectarian women’s organization in the U.S.

March 31, 1776 – Abigail Adams writes to her husband John who is helping to frame the Declaration of Independence and cautions, “Remember the ladies…”

Herstory Birthdays:

March 28, 1886 (1982) – Clara Lemlich, Jewish immigrant from the Ukraine, labor activist, suffragist, and consumer advocate, a leader of the Uprising of 20,000, a labor strike of shirtwaist workers in New York’s garment industry in 1909.

—- 

Annnouncements

PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

—-

Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

No More War
sung by Jacqualine Sharpe from the album Songs of Liberty, Freedom and War (Cutty Wren Records ‎– CWR-101)

Greatest Love of All sung by Kennedy Holmes from the album The Seasons 15 Collection (Republic Records A Division of UMG Recording s, Inc.)

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

Link:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz and our guest Tina Rogers on Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray and Bessie Coleman and our guest Allegra Wilson on the Webinar this Thursday 3/25 on the Role of the District Attorney in Criminal Justice Reform has been uploaded to the web archive. 

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Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz and our guest Tina Rogers on Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray and Bessie Coleman and our guest Allegra Wilson on the Webinar this Thursday 3/25 on the Role of the District Attorney in Criminal Justice Reform has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 3/22/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 3/24/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210322.html

—-

Influential Black American Women: Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray and Bessie Coleman

Criminal Justice Reform and the Role of the District Attorney Webinar on Thursday 3/25

Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz

2. Tina Rogers, Educator

3. Allegra Wilson, Co-Chair of the North Bay Organizing Project’s “Deep Democracy Civic” team

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1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz.  Elaine opens the show with a prayer from the Mi’Kmaq people:

Creator, open our hearts to peace and healing between all people.
Creator, open our hearts to provide and protect for all children of the earth.
Creator, open our hearts to peace and healing between all people.
Creator, open our hearts to respect for the earth, and all the gifts of the earth.
Creator, open our hearts to end exclusion, violence, and fear among all.
Thank you for the gifts of this day and every day.
—-

Thank you all for helping me celebrate my birthday and to all those who attended the Zoom put on by the National

Silent Spring by Rachel Carson - first edition cover

Organization of Women and to Lilith Rogers for allowing us to show her one woman show, “Rachel Carson Returns.” Rachel Carson was the author of “Silent Spring,”

which was one of the first warnings about the dangers of pesticides. An amazing presentation. Silent Spring, nonfiction book written by Rachel Carson that became one of the most-influential books in the modern environmental movement. Published in 1962, Silent Spring was widely read by the public and became a New York Times best seller.

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2Tina Rogers talks about two inspiring black women in American history, Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray and Bessie Coleman. Pauli Murray (1910-1985) is notable on many fronts as civil rights activist, lawyer, women’s rights activist, priest and author. Pauli’s book States’ Laws on Race and Color was considered by Thurgood Marshall the bible of the Civil Rights Movement. She is co-founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW). Ruth Bader Ginsburg named Pauli Murray as co-author in a brief to the seminal gender case Reed v. Reed. She later became the first ordained woman priest in the Episcopalian Church. Letters after her death revealed her struggle with gender identity before that was recognized by the general public.  Bessie Coleman (1892 – 1926) is dear to Tina, as Tina is in training to be a pilot. Bessie was the first African American woman and first Native American to earn a pilot’s license, something she had to travel to France to achieve. She was even an aerial acrobat and called Queen Bess and Brave Bessie. She died in a tragic airplane crash at the age of 34.

 About our Guest:  Tina Rogers is a native of Sonoma County Tina Rogers has devoted her life in trying to understand this beautiful planet, the humans and the other species that share our world. A true humanitarian is what she represents, thorough research, education, and communication with other cultures allows her to see the “big picture.” While attending UC Davis, she turned her passion for the arts, fitness, and wellness into a popular example of master teaching not only to children but people of all ages. She is a role model who enjoys using arts education and fitness, as tools to “crack-the-code” in child development that lasts a lifetime. Tina has given presentations at the Sonoma County Juneteenth Celebrations.

Guest Links:

Tina Rogers: funkystylestreetdance@gmail.com

 —-

3. Allegra Wilson announces an educational online workshop sponsored by North Bay Organizing Project, the Sonoma County ACLU and other organizations on Thursday March 25, 2021, 5 – 6:30 pm called Criminal Justice Reform and the Role of the District Attorney.  Since Jill Ravitch, the first woman DA of the county has decided not to pursue a 4th term, the election to this office will surely face tough competition. How do we know what qualties to look for in a candidate for District Attorney? What is the job description of a DA?  A panelist team of seasoned attornies will look at the the DA’s role in pursuing police accountability and the criminalization of homeless activities, and more. 

About our Guest:  Allegra Wilson is a long-time Santa Rosa resident. From a young age, she has been interested in political activism, and lately has become more involved and passionate about making change at a local level. Most recently, she volunteered for the passage of Measure P for Law Enforcement Accountability, and is Co-Chair of the North Bay Organizing Project’s, “Deep Democracy Civic” team, she also volunteers with the local Sister District Sonoma West chapter. She lives and works in Santa Rosa with her husband and two children.

Guest Links:

Criminal Justice Reform and the Role of the District Attorney, Thursday, March 25, 2021, 5-6:30 pm, Online webinar, Free and open to the public, RSVP at https://sonomaaclu.org/

North Bay Organizing Project: https://www.northbayop.org/

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Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory of the National Women’s History Alliance:  

In 1980, the National Women’s History Project (NWHP) was founded in Santa Rosa, California by Molly Murphy MacGregor, Mary Ruthsdotter, Maria Cuevas, Paula Hammett and Bette Morgan to broadcast women’s historical achievements.
The NWHP started by leading a coalition that successfully lobbied Congress to designate March as National Women’s History Month, now celebrated across the land.
Today, the NWHP Now the National Women’s History Alliance is known nationally as the only clearinghouse providing information and training in multicultural women’s history for educators, community organizations, and parents-for anyone wanting to expand their understanding of women contributions to U. S. history.

Herstory Events:

March 21, 1986 – Debi Thomas becomes first African American woman to win the World Figure Skating Championship.

Herstory Birthdays:

March 20, 1925 (2018) – Romana Acosta Bañuelos, the thirty-fourth Treasurer of the United States, where she served from 1971 to 1974 as the first Hispanic in that role, owner of a multimillion-dollar business, Ramona’s Mexican Food Products, Inc.

March 23, 1908 (1997) – Dominique De Menil, collector of modern art, medieval art, and tribal artifacts, escaped Paris with her children and settled in Houston around 1942, strong supporter of civil rights, created Carter-Menil Human Rights Foundation with former President Jimmy Carter.

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Annnouncements

Criimnal Justice Reform and the Role of the District Attorney

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PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

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Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

Blowing in the Wind
sung byJulie Felix from the album Dylan Covers (2017 Warner Music Group x5)

By My Silence sung by Sonia and Disappear Fear from the album Splash (2008 Disappear Records)

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

Link:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz commenting on the Black Suffragist Ida B. Wells and the environmentalist Rachel Carson, and our guest Abrea Tillman talking about the services and Spring events of the Black Student Union at SRJC has been uploaded to the web archive.

Tags

, , ,

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz commenting on the Black Suffragist Ida B. Wells and the environmentalist Rachel Carson, and our guest Abrea Tillman talking about the services and Spring events of the Black Student Union at SRJC has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 3/15/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 3/17/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210315.html

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Remembering Ida B. Wells and Rachel Carson for Women’s History Month

SRJC Black Student Union Services and Spring Events

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Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz on Ida B. Wells  and Rachel Carson for Women’s History Month

2. Abrea Tillman, Treasurer, Black Student Union, Santa Rosa Junior College

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1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz.  History is so interesting particularly with the history of women getting the vote. At the time it was happening African American woman many former or decent from slavery were involved in the Suffrage Movement even though they knew they would not get the vote. One of these amazing women was Ida B. Wells – one of my heroes who I would like to honor,
For our musical break we played a 4-1/2-minute TED ED clip by Chistina Green talking about Ida B. Wells and her Legacy.

This Thursday March 18, 2021 our NOW monthly Zoom meeting features a presentation by Lilith Rogers of her one-woman show Rachel Carson, the author of Silent Spring  published in 1962, one of the first wake-up calls to the environmental disaster looming with pesticide use. See the meeting information under Announcements.

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2 Abrea Tillman talks about the welcoming role the Black Student Union (BSU) plays in a black student’s orientation at Santa Rosa Junior College to help find resources on the campus and meet new friends in a new environment, as well as provide a support networks of like-looking folks. It is easy to feel alienated when starting on the path to a college degree, and this helps build confidence and awareness of programs helpful to one’s career.  Abrea shares her return to college as a single mother, inspired to make a difference especially after the Black Lives Matter protests against the merciless killing of black people by police officers of 2020. She announces some exciting BSU and SRJC Spring Events open to the public via zoom, and they are listed below under Guest Links.

 About our Guest:  Abrea Tillman was born in Texas. Abrea returned to school in the Spring of 2020 to fulfill her longing for both education and social networking. She became a member of the Santa Rosa Black Student Union at a time when, racial tensions were at an all-time high in America due to the death of George Floyd and countless others, and the Black LIves Matter continued its movement. And we had the extra precautions and social distancing disrupting in-person classes with the global impact of COVID-19.  As Abrea watched countless peaceful protestors march down her street she wanted to march, protest, and physically show her contribution to what she felt was a progressive demonstration against prejudice and racism. However, as a mother still breastfeeding at the time and concerned about the health of her toddler, she showed her support by holding a sign in protest on her front porch. She was stricken with the notion as an African American woman wanted to do more for her culture dedicated herself to social involvement in school. Abrea joined as a member of the Black Student Union (BSU) and she became itsTreasurer and a representative for the BSU to the Intercultural Committee on campus. Recently she was nominated and appointed the
Vice-President of Marketing for the SRJC student government. Abrea has achieved leadership positions to help plan, promote, and educate on African Americans both past and present. Abrea has moved from wanting to be involved, sitting on the sidelines, silently participating, to leadership roles.

Guest Links:

Black Student Union (BSU) Club Meets
Spring 2021: 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month, 5:00-7:00 p.m. by Zoom. Meeting Zoom ID: 986 3063 5214

BSU Contact:
Club E-mail: santarosajc.bsu@gmail.comClub Advisor: Regina Mahiri, rmahiri@santarosa.edu
Social media: @santarosajc_bsu

Guest Events:   BSU Upcoming Events:

March 30th 2021, 5:00-7:00 p.m., Women’s Panel titled “Sistah Queens”, Highlighting local Black Female Professionals and Historic Icons,
Meeting Zoom ID: 986 3063 5214

April 16, 2021, 9:00 am- 3:00 pm, We The Future
Social Justice Conference “Power in Numbers”
Keynote speaker: Boots Riley
Afrocentric Hair in History Open Discussion featuring our guest Abrea Tillman: LA Beauty and Hair/Black Excellence
Zoom ID: TBD, RSVP at
https://wethefuture.santarosa.edu/

SRJC Club Card Premium
A rewards Programs for student offered by the Santa Rosa Junior College. Students may purchase card at:
https://studentlife.santarosa.edu/cubcard-premium
Businesses may signup to partner with SRJC: https://studentlife.santarosa.edu/cubcard-premium-business-interest-form

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Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory of the National Women’s History Alliance:  

In 1980, the National Women’s History Project (NWHP) was founded in Santa Rosa, California by Molly Murphy MacGregor, Mary Ruthsdotter, Maria Cuevas, Paula Hammett and Bette Morgan to broadcast women’s historical achievements.
The NWHP started by leading a coalition that successfully lobbied Congress to designate March as National Women’s History Month, now celebrated across the land.
Today, the NWHP Now the National Women’s History Alliance is known nationally as the only clearinghouse providing information and training in multicultural women’s history for educators, community organizations, and parents-for anyone wanting to expand their understanding of women contributions to U. S. history.

Herstory Events:

March 20, 1852 – Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin is published and becomes the second best-selling book of the 19th century. The Bible was the first. Published in 1852 Historians typically say that Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin had a tremendous impact on the North. … Uncle Tom’s Cabin is said to have caused people in the North to become much more opposed to slavery. It is said to have helped make slavery less popular by putting faces on the slaves and on their owners.

Herstory Birthdays:

March 17, 1902 (1995) – Alice Greenough, carried mail at age 15, joined a Wild West show, became a professional rodeo rider in 1921 and earned about $12,000 yearly, toured Australia and Spain as well as the U.S.

March 18, 1970 – Queen Latifah (Dana Elaine Owens) is an American singer, songwriter, rapper, actress, and producer, who said, “I made decisions that I regret, and I took them as learning experiences… I’m human, not perfect, like anybody else.” FYI our host Elaine B. Holtz shares this Birthday.

March 19, 1875 (1957) – Margaret Foley, labor organizer, suffragist, and social worker, she was an out-spoken suffrage activist who would loudly confront anti-suffrage speakers, made a solo balloon flight over Lawrence, Massachusetts, tossing suffrage literature from the basket (1910)

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Annnouncements

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NOW Meeting March 18, 2021 Rachel Carson presentation by Liilth Rogers
Silent Spring by Rachel Carson - first edition cover

Silent Spring is an environmental science book by Rachel Carson. The book was published in 1962, documenting the adverse environmental effects caused by the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Lilith tells this story in such an inspiring fashion, that you do not want to miss her performance on March 18, 2021.  

Lilith Rogers
Lilith Rogers

Just think of what we might have accomplished, if we would have listened to Rachel Carson 59 years ago when she wrote the book.  Last month we had more than 60 participants at our monthly meeting via Zoom,  which was a great networking opportunity. For more information visit http://nowsonoma.org/ 

                                                                     

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PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

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Sonoma County Black Forum Food Distribution

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Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

How one journalist risked her life to hold murderers accountable
by Christina Greer from the single TED ED talk (2019 TED ED Lessons in Learning YouTube )

Blood of the Ancients/Hope of a New World sung by Betsy Rose/Womansong Chorus from the album Welcome to the Circle (Paper Crane Music)

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

Link:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz commenting on on Frances Harper and Black Suffragists and guest Deborah McKay on Carrie Chapman Catt, Founder of the League of Women Voters has been uploaded to the web archive.

Tags

,

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz commenting on on Frances Harper and Black Suffragists and guest Deborah McKay on Carrie Chapman Catt, Founder of the League of Women Voters has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 3/8/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 3/10/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210308.html

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Frances Harper, Abolitionist and Suffragist

Carrie Chapman Catt, Founder of the League of Women Voters

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Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz on the celebrating International Women’s Day; the passing of Joanna Shapanus, KBBF volunteer; on black women influencing the suffrage movement; and highlighting the life of Frances Harper, abolitionist and suffragist.

2. Deborah McKay, former President, Women’s League of Voters (LWV) – Sonoma County Chapter, on Carrie Chapman Catt founding the LWV.

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1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz.

Today, March 8th, is International Women’s Day. This year, the theme for International Women’s Day is: Women in  leadership: Achieving an equal future in a COVID-19 world. We celebrate the tremendous efforts by women and girls around the world in shaping a more equal future, recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and recognize the gaps that remain.

Joanna Shapanus, KBBF volunteer since the founding of Radio KBBF, first aired in 1973, was laid to rest today. She was in her early 70s. To learn Spanish she volunteered for the Peace Corps and spent two years in Ecuador. She loved to say that she was one of the first gringas (white person) to volunteer for KBBF in the early years of KBBF.

During the 19th and 20th centuries, Black women played an active role in the struggle for universal suffrage. They participated in pol itical meetings and organized political societies. African American women attended political conventions at their local churches where they planned strategies to gain the right to vote. In the late 1800s, more Black women worked for churches, newspapers, secondary schools, and colleges, which gave them a larger platform to promote their ideas. But in spite of their hard work, many people did not listen to them. Black men and white women usually led civil rights organizations and set the agenda. They often excluded Black women from their organizations and activities. For example, the National American Woman Suffrage
Association prevented Black women from attending their conventions. Black women often had to march separately from white women in suffrage parades. In addition when Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony wrote the History of Woman Suffrage in the 1880s, they featured white suffragists while largely ignoring the contributions of African American suffragists. Black women found themselves pul led in two directions. Black men wanted their support in fighting racial discrimination and prejudice, while white women wanted
them to help change the inferior status of women in American society. Both groups ignored the unique challenges that African American women faced. Black reformers like Mary Church Terrell, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and Harriet Tubman understood that both the ir race and their sex affected their rights and opportunities. For this show and the next two shows I will honor one of these woman, for this show. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper.

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper was a reformer in the abolition movement, in the women’s rights movement, in the temperance movement, and in the civil rights movement. In addition, her poetry and essays are significant because she used them as vehicles to comment upon the experiences of African Americans. Harper was born to free Black parents in Baltimore, Maryland in 1825. At age twenty-six, she moved to Columbus, Ohio, where she taught domestic science at Union Seminary. Shortly after her departure, Maryland enacted a law forbidding free blacks living in the North to immigrate into that state. The penalty was imprisonment and sale into slavery. Harper decided to dedicate her efforts to the anti-slavery crusade. She spent the next eight years traveling around the United States, delivering anti-slavery lectures and writing essays and poems about what she observed in the States. Her essays and poems were widely circulated in Black journals and she published a variety of novels, short stories, and poetry collections, most of which focused on the quality of life of African Americans. In addition to her abolitionist activities, Harper was committed to the temperance movement and the struggle for women’s rights. She believed that alcohol was linked to the decline of the Black community and wrote multiple poems on this topic. Harper was also focused on women’s suffrage and the pursuit of equal rights, job opportunities, and education for Black women. She was a member of the American Equal Suffrage Association, and later formed the American Woman Suffrage Association with Frederick Douglass and other reformers.

2 Deborah McKay talks of the impact of Carrie Chapman Catt had in directing the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and founding the League of Women Voters (LWV) in 1920 after the passage of the 19th Amendment to bring women into the political mainstream. Deborah talks about the mission of LWV to inform citizens with candidate debates and ballot measure forums before casting their ballots. LWV wants to make democracy work. The local chapter started in the 1950s in Sonoma County and has a website offering educational videos and reports on the electoral process, money in politices, alternatives to the electoral college, rank choice voting, and campaigning for office. Check out LWV for learning how to participate in democracy, volunteering and offering support.

 About our Guest:  Deborah McKay is a lifelong resident of Sonoma County and has always been active in the community. Previously she served as the treasurer and president of the YWCA. She just stepped down as the president of the League of Women Voters for two years. She is the the former Chair of the League’s Outreach Committee where she taught over 60 local community members how to register citizens to vote.

Guest Links:

League of Women’s Voters – Sonoma County Chapter:  lwvsonoma.org

LWV-Sonoma County YouTube Channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvppI3yS3Hcus_mTECDsbFA

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Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory of the National Women’s History Alliance:  

In 1980, the National Women’s History Project (NWHP) was founded in Santa Rosa, California by Molly Murphy MacGregor, Mary Ruthsdotter, Maria Cuevas, Paula Hammett and Bette Morgan to broadcast women’s historical achievements.
The NWHP started by leading a coalition that successfully lobbied Congress to designate March as National Women’s History Month, now celebrated across the land.
Today, the NWHP Now the National Women’s History Alliance is known nationally as the only clearinghouse providing information and training in multicultural women’s history for educators, community organizations, and parents-for anyone wanting to expand their understanding of women contributions to U. S. history.

Herstory Events:

March 8.  International Women’s Day (IWD), grew out of the labor movement to become a recognized annual event by the United Nations (UN). The seeds of it were planted in 1908, when 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorter working hours, better pay and the right to vote. The idea to make the day international came from a woman called Clara Zetkin. She suggested the idea in 1910 at an International Conference of Working Women in Copenhagen. There were 100 women there, from 17 countries, and they agreed on her suggestion unanimously. It was first celebrated in 1911, in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland. The centenary was celebrated in 2011, so this year we are technically celebrating the 110th International Women’s Day. Things were made official in 1975 when the United Nations started celebrating the day. The first theme adopted by the UN (in 1996) was “Celebrating the past, Planning for the Future”.
International Women’s Day has become a date to celebrate how far women have come in society, in politics and in economics, while the political roots of the day mean strikes and protests are organized to raise awareness of continued inequality.

Herstory Birthdays:

March 9, 1928 (1987) – Graciela Olivarez, Chicana activist, first woman and Latina graduate from Notre Dame Law School, one of first two women on the board of Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund.

March 9,1910 (1996) – Sue Lee was a labor organizer in San Francisco and led the 15-week strike against National Dollar Stores garment factory for better wages and working conditions, her story is featured in Unbound Voices: A Documentary History of Chinese Women in San Francisco.

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Annnouncements

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National Organization for Women (NOW)

National Organization for Women (NOW)Thursday, March 18, 2021, National Organization for Women (NOW) Sonoma County Chapter monthly membership Zoom meeting, free and open to the public, featuring the one woman show performed by Lilith Rogers where she becomes Rachel Carson.

Lilith Rogers
Lilith Rogers

Silent Spring is an environmental science book by Rachel Carson. The book was published in 1962, documenting the adverse environmental effects caused by the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Lilith tells this story in such an inspiring fashion, that you do not want to miss her performance. 

Just think of what we might have accomplished, if we would have listened to Rachel Carson 59 years ago when she wrote the book.  Last month we had more than 60 participants at our monthly meeting via Zoom,  which was a great networking opportunity. For more information visit http://nowsonoma.org/  or call (707) 545-5036.

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Celebrating Familiy Portraits Project in downtown Petaluma from January 29 – March 15, 2021.  https://pbcd4us.com/celebrating-family/

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PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless
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Sonoma County Black Forum Food Distribution

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Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

Bella ciao
byBetsy Rose and the WomanSong Chorus from the album Welcome to the Circle (2006 Paper Crane Music)

Bread and Roses sung by Boby McGee from the album Classic Labor Songs from Smithsonian Folkways (2006 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings)

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

Link:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz commenting on the Presidential Pardon of Susan B. Anthony and guest Molly Murphy MacGregor on Establishing of the National Women’s History Month has been uploaded to the web archive.

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz commenting on the Presidential Pardon of Susan B. Anthony and guest Molly Murphy MacGregor on Establishing of the National Women’s History Month has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 3/1/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 3/3/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210301.html

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Standing on the Shoulders:
National Women’s History Month

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Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz on the Presidential Pardon of Susan B. Anthony

2. Molly Murphy MacGregor, Chair of Board of Directors, Co-Founder, National Women’s History Alliance

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1. Commentary by host Elaine B. Holtz.  I am going to play a five minute clip of the Trial of Susan B. Anthony. Susan B. Anthony devoted more than fifty years of her life to the cause of woman suffrage. After casting her ballot in the 1872 Presidential election in her hometown of Rochester, New York, she was arrested, indicted, tried, and convicted for voting illegally and fined $100 In 2020 President Trump attempted to pardon Susan B. Anthony for this crime and it was rejected. . According to Deborah L. Hughes of the National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House in Rochester, N.Y.. “Objection! Mr. President, Susan B. Anthony must decline your offer of a pardon,” she said. She continued, “Anthony wrote in her diary in 1873 that her trial for voting was ‘The greatest outrage History ever witnessed.’ She was not allowed to speak as a witness in her own defense, because she was a woman. At the conclusion of arguments, Judge Hunt dismissed the jury and pronounced her guilty. She was outraged to be denied a trial by jury. She proclaimed, ‘I shall never pay a dollar of your unjust penalty.’ To pay would have been to validate the proceedings. To pardon Susan B. Anthony does the same.”

So let’s enjoy a piece of history and listen to a portion of what went on in the trial of Susan B. Anthony.

2Molly Murphy MacGregor talks of the seeds of her transformation into an advocate for Women’s History and of the seeds planted by women in the nation’s history producing fruits like the first woman elected vice-President of the United States, Kamala Harris. Molly through the National Women’s History Alliance keeps the ties open to women’s groups around the country, despite the pandemic, to publicize and encourage women’s events to grow the movement for gender equality of opportunity. Join her newsletter list to keep yourself informed and take part in some of the online events that are planned.

 About our Guest:  Molly Murphy MacGregor is a former high school social studies teacher who has worked for over 35 years in the field of gender equity and women’s history. Molly is one of the co-founders of the National Women’s History Alliance (formerly “National Women’s History Project”) and is presently the Chair of NWHA Board of Directors. See its Herstory below. MacGregor conducts women’s history workshops and women’s historic sites tours throughout the country. She also works with state and national agencies on strategies and programs to help acknowledge and recognize the historic contributions of women. Her work in the field of multicultural women’s history has been widely recognized including awards from the National Education Association, the US Department of Education, and the National Association for Multicultural Education, and the Association for Gender Equity Leadership in Education Leadership.

Guest Links:

Molly Murphy MacGregor email: nwhp1980@gmail.com

National Women’s History Alliance – register to get the newsletter and/or make a donation: https://nationalwomenshistoryalliance.org/

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Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory of the National Women’s History Alliance:  

In 1980, the National Women’s History Project (NWHP) was founded in Santa Rosa, California by Molly Murphy MacGregor, Mary Ruthsdotter, Maria Cuevas, Paula Hammett and Bette Morgan to broadcast women’s historical achievements.
The NWHP started by leading a coalition that successfully lobbied Congress to designate March as National Women’s History Month, now celebrated across the land.
Today, the NWHP Now the National Women’s History Alliance is known nationally as the only clearinghouse providing information and training in multicultural women’s history for educators, community organizations, and parents-for anyone wanting to expand their understanding of women contributions to U. S. history.

Herstory Events:

March 1, 1978 – Women’s History Week is first observed in Sonoma County, California.

March 1, 1987 – Congress passes a resolution designating March as Women’s History Month.

March 2, 1903 – the Martha Washington Hotel opens in New York City, becoming the first hotel exclusively for women.

March 3, 1913 – Women’s Suffrage Parade in Washington, DC, where over 8000 women gathered to demand a constitutional amendment guaranteeing the right to vote.

March 4, 1917 – Jeannette Rankin (R-MT) took her seat as the first female member of Congress.

March 4, 1933 – Frances Perkins becomes United States Secretary of Labor, the first female member of the United States Cabinet.

Herstory Birthdays:

 March 2, 1860 (1961) – Susanna M. Salter, mayor of Argonia, Kansas, becoming the first woman elected as mayor and the first woman elected to any political office in the United States (1887).

March 2, 1888 (1956) – Anna Clemenc, founded and served as president of the local Women’s Auxiliary No. 15 of the Western Federation of Miners, was an active participant in the Copper Country Strike of 1913–1914, and an inducted member of the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame (1996).

March 3, 1893 (1998) – Beatrice Wood, artist and studio potter involved in the Avant Garde movement in the United States, referred to as the “Mama of Dada”.

March 3, 1943 (1995) – Myra Sadker, studied and researched sex roles in children’s literature, wrote texts to challenge sexism in education of girls because it short-changed their ambitions, co-authored “Sexism in School and Society” (1973).

March 4, 1948 (2005) – Jean O’Leary, lesbian and gay rights activist, founder of Lesbian Feminist Liberation, one of the first lesbian activist groups in the women’s movement, was an early member and co-director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, co-founded National Coming Out Day.

March 5, 1854 (1915) – Mary Garrett, suffragist and philanthropist, founded the Bryn Mawr School for Girls which was focused on scholastic achievement (1885), donated funds to Bryn Mawr College, funded the establishment of Johns Hopkins Medical School with the provision they accept women students on the same standing as men (1893).

March 5, 1931 (1997) – Geraldyn (Jerrie) Cobb, record-setting aviator, first woman to pass qualifying exams for astronaut training (1959) but not allowed to train because of her gender.

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Annnouncements

—-

Thursday, March 18, 2021, National Organization for Women (NOW) Sonoma County Chapter monthly membership Zoom meeting, free and open to the public, featuring the one woman show performed by Lilith Rogers where she becomes Rachel Carson. Silent Spring is an environmental science book by Rachel Carson. The book was published in 1962, documenting the adverse environmental effects caused by the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Lilith tells this story in such an inspiring fashion, that you do not want to miss her performance. Just think of what we might have accomplished, if we would have listened to Rachel Carson 59 years ago when she wrote the book.  Last month we had more than 60 participants at our monthly meeting via Zoom,  which was a great networking opportunity. For more information visit http://nowsonoma.org/index.html or call (707) 545-5036.

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Celebrating Familiy Portraits Project in downtown Petaluma from January 29 – March 15, 2021.  https://pbcd4us.com/celebrating-family/

—-

PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

—-

Sonoma County Black Forum Food Distribution

—-

Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

Susan B. Anthony (Arrest)
spoken by Susan Kempler and Doreen Rappaport from the album But the Women Rise, Vol. Voices of Women in History (1971 Folkways Records)

Standing on the Shoulders sung by Earth Mama from the album Love Large (1966 Rouse House, LLC)

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

Link:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz and guest Celeste Austin on Black Lives Matter in Black History Month has been uploaded to the web archive

Tags

,

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz and guest Celeste Austin on Black Lives Matter in Black History Month has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 2/22/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 2/24/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210222.html

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Black Lives Matter and Black History Month

—-

Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring Guest

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1.Celeste Austin, is a local activist and inpiration in Sonoma County

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1. Celeste Austin discusses why Black Lives Matter is important in celebrating Black History Month. She shares how her own family of African heritage was affected by grief and economic challenges upon the killing of her grandfather at the kitchen table as her father was still in the womb of her shocked mother. Her grandfather’s life mattered so much and reverberated down time through the family. 14-year-old Emmett Till, lynched in 1955 for allegedly offending a woman in her store in Mississippi, his life mattered to his mother and family who chose to open the casket for the world to see. George Floyd, whose 8 minute and 46 second slow and deliberate asphyxiation by a police officer, which was broadcast over social media last year, his life mattered so much that it led to massive Black Lives Matter protests, non-violent except for the brutal enforcement by the police of various cities, in stark contrast to the police presence at the white supremacist insurrection in our Capitol January 6, 2021. Celeste encourages the conversation as it affects all of us. She reminds us that 13-year old Andy Lopez of Mexican heritage was shot and killed by a Sonoma County Sheriff’s deputy in 2013. Andy’s life mattered to his grieving family and to our county as activists pushed for oversight of the Sheriff’s Office. Last week Celeste gave a talk at the Center for Spiritual Living Lunchtime series by zoom on Black Lives Matter.

 About our Guest:  Celeste Austin is a local activist in Sonoma County.

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Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory Events:

February 24, 1912 – Henrietta Szold founds Hadassah, the largest Jewish organization in American history, focusing on healthcare and education in the Israel and the U.S.

February 24, 1967 – Jocelyn Bell Burnell makes the first discovery of a pulsar, a rapidly rotating neutron star.

February 27, 1922 – U.S. Supreme Court upholds the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which guarantees women the right to vote.

Herstory Birthdays:

February 19, 1952 – Amy Tan, novelist, mother-daughter relationships are subject of The Joy Luck Club, now in 35 languages, The Kitchen God’s Wife (1991), and The Bonesetter’s Daughter (2001).

February 20, 1805 (1879) – Angelina Grimké, abolitionist, joined the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society in 1835 and addressed “mixed” audiences in 1837, wrote An Appeal to the Christian Women of the South criticizing slavery in 1836, after which a price was placed on her head should she return to South Carolina.

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Annnouncements

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Celebrating Familiy Portraits Project in downtown Petaluma from January 29 – March 15, 2021.  https://pbcd4us.com/celebrating-family/

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PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

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Sonoma County Black Forum Food Distribution

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Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

Black Lives Matter
by Lovely Hoffmanfrom the Single Black Lives Matter (2017 Lovely Hoffman)

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

Link:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz Commenting on Black History Month, V-Day, and Reading of her Poem “Friends and Lovers” with her partner and co-producer Ken Norton has been uploaded to the web archive.

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Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz Commenting on Black History Month, V-Day, and Reading of her Poem Friends and Lovers with her partner and co-producer Ken Norton has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 2/15/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 2/17/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210215.html

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Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

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Featuring

Click the Name to access the Segment below

1. Elaine B. Holtz, Host and Co-Producer, Women’s Spaces, Commentary on Black History Month

2. Ken Norton, Co-Producer of Women’s Spaces, Reading with Elaine of her Poem Friends and Lovers

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Commentary by Elaine B. Holtz, Host of Women’s Spaces

1. Elaine talks about Black History Month and some women that are inspirational in their struggle for freedom: Harriet Tubman, as portrayed in the film Harriet, is credited with freeing over 90 Blacks from slavery, and Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper, who after discovering at the age of 44 of the right to vote joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the struggle to register to vote. We play a recording of Fannie Lou Hamer and commentary done by Peoples TV.

V-Day (Februry 14th) and annual reading of the Vagina Monologues will be online this year.

Remember, this Thursday February 18th from 6:30 – 8:00 pm via Zoom is the County Chapter’s NOW meeting with a special presentation on Black History Month and talks by the newest City Councilwomen elected in November in Sonoma County. See the Announcements below for further description.

Links: 

Harriet Tubman Historical Society: http://www.harriet-tubman.org/

The True Story Behind the Harriet Tubman Movie –
“Harriet,” a new film starring Cynthia Erivo, is the first feature film dedicated solely to the American icon – Smithsonian Magazine: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/true-story-harriet-tubman-movie-180973413/

How Fannie Lou Hamer Fought For The Rights Of Black Americans, Story, PeopleTV: https://youtu.be/xNMvNRPKA3k

Fannie Lou Hamer’s Dauntless Fight for Black Americans’ Right to Vote, Smithsonian Magazine hhttps://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/fannie-lou-hamers-dauntless-fight-for-black-americans-right-vote-180975610/

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Vagina Monologues by Eve Ansler takes place annually on or about V-Day (February 14th). We play the Break the Chain sung by1 Billion Rising during this show. Check for events online this year: https://www.onebillionrising.org/

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2. Special Reading for Valentine’s  Day by Ken and Elaine of Elaine’s Poem Friends and Lovers

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3. Closing Reading by Elaine of her Poem For Max

For Max by Elaine B. Holtz

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Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory Birthdays:

February 14, 1904 (1988) – Jessie O’Connor, journalist, Smith College magna cum laude (1925), reported textile strikes in North Carolina and coal strikes in Harland Co., Kentucky, helped those accused of communism, Vietnam anti-war opposition, and anti-Reagan protests.

February 15, 1921 – The Suffrage Monument, depicting Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucretia Mott, sculpted by Adelaide Johnson, is dedicated at the U.S. Capitol.

February 15, 1820 (1906) – Susan B. Anthony, inspirational leader of 19th century women’s right movement, national suffrage strategist, lecturer, activist

February 18, 1931 – August 5, 2019, Toni Morrison, Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, first African American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature (1993.

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Annnouncements

Check links in case of postponement, cancellations, or restrictions due to pandemic precautions:

National Organization for Women (NOW)

National Organization for Women (NOW)February 18, 2021, Thursday, 6:30-8:00 pm. via Zoom, National Organization for Women (NOW)-Sonoma County Chapter, 30 minute membership meeting followed by a Special Program Honoring Black History Month and the Newly Elected City Councilwomen of Sonoma County with presentations and Q & A. Our Presenters are:

  • Tina Rogers – Overview of Black History Month
  • Jackie Elward – Vice Mayor – Rohnert City Council
  • Natalie Rogers – Vice Mayor – Santa Rosa City Council
  • Skylear Palacios– Council Member Healdsburg City Council

NOW’s purpose is to take action through intersectional grassroots activism to promote feminist ideals, lead societal change, eliminate discrimination, and achieve and protect the equal rights of all women and girls in all aspects of social, political, and economic life. Come join our chapter serving California North of San Francisco!

Free and open to the public:

Join Zoom Meeting on 2/18/2021 6:30-8:00 pm, Click here.
Meeting ID: 875 8875 3750 Passcode: 520289
No internet device? Join by Phone +1 669 900 9128 (San Jose)

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Celebrating Familiy Portraits Project in downtown Petaluma from January 29 – March 15, 2021.  https://pbcd4us.com/celebrating-family/

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PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

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Sonoma County Black Forum Food Distribution

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Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

Break the Chain
sung by 1 Billion Risingfrom the Single Break the Chain (2012 Tena Clark Productions)

What the World Needs Now is Love Sweet Love, sung by Broadway for Orlando from the album from the album Broadway for Orlando (2016 Broadway Records).

And Still I Rise by Maya Angelou in a public reading whose recording is available on Youtube: https://youtu.be/qviM_GnJbOM

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

Link:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz and guests Stephanie King on the Schulz Museum Online Exhibits and Programs and Faith Ross on the Petaluma Blacks for Community Development Brings the Museum Exhibit “To the Streets: The Family Portrait Project” for Black History Month has been uploaded to the web archive.

Women’s Spaces Radio Show with host Elaine B. Holtz and guests Stephanie King on the Schulz Museum Online Exhibits and Programs and Faith Ross on the Petaluma Blacks for Community Development Brings the Museum Exhibit “To the Streets: The Family Portrait Project” for Black History Month has been uploaded to the web archive.  The show was broadcast in the North Bay and streamed worldwide over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM  on Monday 2/8/2021 at 11 AM, repeats at 11 PM on KBBF, and then repeat broadcasts in Petaluma and streamed worldwide over Radio KPCA 103.3 FM on the following Wednesday 2/10/2021 at 11 AM.

Read description of the show and bios of the guests, see links referenced on the show and the playlist,  on its archive page at:

http://www.womensspaces.com/ArchiveWSA21/WSA210208.html

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Subscribe for Podcasts of the Show
via  this link for iTunes or via this link for Podcasts.com

Featuring Guests

Click the Guest Name to access Discussion below:

1. Stephanie King, Marketing Director, Charles M. Schulz Museum

2. Faith Ross, Petaluma Blacks for Community Development

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 Click the Button to access Page Sections below:

Commentary by Elaine B. Holtz, Host of Women’s Spaces

This coming Friday, February 12 according to the Chinese Calendar 2021 is the Year of the Ox. The Ox.is The second animal of the Chinese zodiac. According to astrologers, the Ox denotes the hard work, positivity and honesty that will be manifested in all of us in the coming 12 months, So Happy New Year to our Chinese brothers and sisters.

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Discussion with Featured Guests:

1.  Stephanie King, Marketing Director, discusses the changes the Charles M. Schulz Museum has undergone since the beginning of the pandemic restrictions. Most of the staff work remotely at home and more exhibits have come online. There are even free downloads for entertaining the children at home. See the links to these webpages below Guest LInks.

About our Guest: Stephanie King has been working for the Schulz Museum for 2-1/2 years. She has her BA degree from UC Santa Cruz in History of Art and Visual Culture and has worked at other museums.

Guest Links:

Schulz Museum On-Demand: https://schulzmuseum.org/schulz-museum-on-demand/

Hidden Treasures: Unseen Originals from the Collection: https://schulzmuseum.org/hidden-treasures-online/

Schulz Museum At Home (free): https://schulzmuseum.org/museum-at-home/

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2. Faith Ross talks about how Petaluma Blacks for Community Development has adjusted their annual Museum exhibit for Black History Month and taken it to the Streets for the pandemic as Celebrating Family Portraits. With the help of the City Mayor and City Manager of Petaluma, and Paige Green Photography, Petaluma Family portraits, featuring the multicultural families of Petaluma, are exhibited in over 40 storefronts in downtown Petaluma from January 29 – March 15, 2021.

About our Guest: Faith Ross has lived in Sonoma County since 1975. She is a retired Auditor/Appraiser for the County of Sonoma, Assessor’s Office. Faith is on the board of several local organizations- Petaluma Community Relations Council and the Black Forum. Faith is the president of Petaluma Blacks for Community Development. She and her husband have two grown sons and eight grandchildren.

Guest Links:

New website for Petaluma Blacks for Community Development https://pbcd4us.com/

Celebrating Familiy Portraits Project in downtown Petaluma from January 29 – March 15, 2021.  https://pbcd4us.com/celebrating-family/

Herstory

Our history is our strength. Check out important dates to remember in herstory at the National Women’s History Alliance

National Women's History Alliance

Herstory Events:

February 12, 1869 – The Utah Territorial Legislature passes a bill allowing women to vote. In 1871, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, leaders of the early suffrage movement, visited the Utah Territory. They wanted to witness women in Utah exercising their right to vote.

Herstory Birthdays:

February 9, 1944 – Alice Walker, writer, first African American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, for The Color Purple (1983).

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Annnouncements

Check links in case of postponement, cancellations, or restrictions due to pandemic precautions:

National Organization for Women (NOW)

February 18, 2021, Thursday, 6:30-8:00 pm. via Zoom, National Organization for Women (NOW)-Sonoma County Chapter, 30 minute membership meeting followed bya Special Program Honoring Black History Month and the Newly Elected City Councilwomen of Sonoma County with presentations and Q & A.

Our Presenters are:

  • Tina Rogers – Overview of Black History Month
  • Jackie Elward – Vice Mayor – Rohnert City Council
  • Natalie Rogers – Vice Mayor – Santa Rosa City Council
  • Skylear Palacios– Council Member Healdsburg City Council

NOW’s purpose is to take action through intersectional grassroots activism to promote feminist ideals, lead societal change, eliminate discrimination, and achieve and protect the equal rights of all women and girls in all aspects of social, political, and economic life. Come join our chapter serving California North of San Francisco!

Free and open to the public:

Join Zoom Meeting on 2/18/2021 6:30-8:00 pm, Click here.
Meeting ID: 875 8875 3750 Passcode: 520289
No internet device? Join by Phone +1 669 900 9128 (San Jose)

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Celebrating Familiy Portraits Project in downtown Petaluma from January 29 – March 15, 2021.  https://pbcd4us.com/celebrating-family/

—-

PJC Donation Drive for the Homeless

—-

Sonoma County Black Forum Food Distribution

—-

Music Selections

The Opening and Closing Theme song is with permission of the Composer and Singer Alix Dobkin: The Woman in Your Life is You by Alix Dobkin from the album Living with Lavender Jane (2010 Women’s Wax Works) – www.alixdobkin.com

Ain’t I A Woman, recited by Cecily Tyson on Capitol Hill on April 28, 2009 at the unveiling of the bust of Sojourner Truth, the 19th-century slave turned abolitionist who was also a fiery advocate for womens rights. This bust is the first sculpture to honor an African American woman in the United States Capitol.  https://youtu.be/-0YR1eiG0us

Sojourner Truth Bust in the Capitol in DC
Bust of Sojourner Truth seen in Emancipation Hall of the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center

Stand Up (from the film Harriet) sung by Cynthia Erivo from the single Stand Up – From the film Harriet (2019 Back Lot Records).

Harriet Tubman young
Harriet Tubman in her youth

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For music purchasing opportunity: 

Link:  Spinitron.com Playlist for Women’s Spaces Show